Tag Archives: cochineal

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FEEDBACK FRIDAY: This Week in Natural Dye Questions

Each week, we are emailed with questions from our natural dye community asking simple and complex questions that we thought might be worth sharing. Here are a handful from this week answered by natural dyer in chief, Kathy Hattori, Founder of Botanical Colors: I’ve always used my tap water to dye but have just started […]

Phaeolus schweinitzii, known as Dyer's Polypore.  Thank you, Erica Iseminger!

FEEDBACK FRIDAY: This Week in Natural Dye Questions

Each week, we are emailed with questions from our natural dye community asking simple and complex questions that we thought might be worth sharing. Here are a handful from this week answered by natural dyer in chief, Kathy Hattori, Founder of Botanical Colors: When working with iron on a larger scale, what is the best […]

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FEEDBACK FRIDAY: This Week in Natural Dye Questions (Red Edition)

Each week, we are emailed with questions from our natural dye community asking simple and complex questions that we thought might be worth sharing. Here are a handful from this week answered by natural dyer in chief, Kathy Hattori, Founder of Botanical Colors: I really want to get a deep red what should I use? […]

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Piped Indigo Dots

FEEDBACK FRIDAY: This Week in Natural Dye Questions

Each week, we are emailed with questions from our natural dye community asking simple and complex questions that we thought might be worth sharing. Here are a handful from this week answered by natural dyer in chief, Kathy Hattori, Founder of Botanical Colors: Do you have any tips on getting a crimson red on cotton […]

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VIDEO: An Exploration of Place and Natural Dyes, Cordova Alaska

Paul Gaugin was once quoted as saying “Color! What a deep and mysterious language, the language of dreams.” It’s true. Those who stop to marvel at the color all around them easily see the mysteries- looking deeply into the crashing roll of a wave, the veins on a leaf, the back of a beetle tooling […]

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A Closer Look at the History of Cochineal

According to The Advocate, “The prickly pear cactus was a scourge in outback regions of Australia until the Cactoblastus moth was introduced in 1926 as a biological method to eradicate this introduced plant pest. A consignment of 3,000 Cactoblastus moth eggs reproduced and the next generation numbered in excess of two and a half million eggs.  These were distributed to selected areas from which eggs were gathered […]

Used by permission from photographer Bobby Bonaparte

On Makers Row: 8 Frequently Asked Questions About Natural Colors and Dyes

(Previously published on Makers Row) What are natural dyes? Natural dyes are textile colorants that are derived from plants, insects and other natural materials. They are steeped in history, mystery and lore and each culture has its own set of prized colors, traditions and meanings. Prior to the mid-19th century, all dyes were from the […]

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Join Us! Week-Long Fiber Retreat and Festival in Cordova, Alaska

We’ll be one of the 10 instructors at this amazing week-long fiber retreat and festival June 24th to July 3rd, put on by the fabulous Dotty Widmann and The Net Loft in Cordova, Alaska called the Cordova Gansey Project. Join us as we journey outdoors to harvest and dye with a variety of local plants […]

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Confused About Cochineal? Ask Kathy!

We get so many questions about natural dyes, from techniques to color fastness to “what does it smell like?” The questions are frequent so we’re hoping many of you will send them in so Kathy can properly answer and give you some help! Today’s question came in from one of our favorite textile artists, Abigail […]